Personalizing Shopping Experiences: How to Make Customers Feel Right at Home

Prior to the internet take over, shopping was inherently social—you were shopping alongside likeminded consumers, you were asking employees for help regarding quality and price point, and you likely invited friends or family to join whatever shopping trip was planned for that Saturday afternoon. Overall, shopping was tremendously communal.

Now, with the convenience of online shopping people are able to make purchases from their phones and computers wherever they are—narrowing the focus to become very personal. It’s easy for online shoppers to think of themselves as the only shopper, after all they don’t see every transaction coming through on a daily basis from across the world. To the modern day consumer, they are the most important client at any given moment. Feeding into this mindset with a few personalized touches can help to establish a healthy relationship with buyers.

Shoppers Expect a Catered Shopping Experience

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It’s important to note that online shoppers have grown to expect a certain level of personalized shopping
Whether that is something as simple as making sure every customer is greeted by a “personal shopper” via online chat, or something a bit more in depth like geo mapping your customers’ location and automatically adjusting the pricing to their currency. Today’s shoppers won’t be concerned when your website knows they are shopping from the UK, instead they will be happily surprised to see all prices converted to pounds.

Personalized Shopping Profiles

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Internet powerhouses like Netflix and Amazon have set the pace for encouraging customers to create profiles that allow them to create wish lists that keep track of favorites and save their purchase history. This is a win-win situation as customers appreciate the convenience of a website that tracks their shopping habits, and retailers have the opportunity to suggest other items or services they may be interested in. Keep in mind that nobody likes being bombarded with requests for email addresses and personal info, to avoid making customers feel like they are being harassed, it is best to ask for this information once they are actually making a purchase so they can fully enjoy their shopping (and browsing) experience.

Benefits the Retailer

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We are going to state the obvious here, but the road to a successful business is paved with happy customers. That right there is the number one benefit to creating a personalized shopping experience for your customers; they will appreciate the thoughtful changes that bring the customer back to the center of the shopping experience. But on top of that, this is an opportunity to learn more about the demographics of your shoppers. All of the things necessary to providing white-glove service (location, desired price point, browsing habits and purchase history) are the very same things you can use as feedback and information to fine-tune your website and in the end, make your business more successful.

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About the Author

Brett Chesney